Steven Gray, Ph.D.

Department

Conservation & Science

Center

Alexander Center for Applied Population Biology

Title

Postdoctoral Researcher

Education

Ph.D. – Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University Dual
Ph.D. – Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior, Michigan State University
M.S. – Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University

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More Information

Areas of Expertise

  • Conservation
  • Wildlife ecology and management
  • Spatial ecology
  • Movement ecology
  • Applied research

About

Steven is an ecologist interested in aiding conservation by applying quantitative analytical tools to inform conservation action. His background includes a diversity of research topics and systems, but his training is primarily in conducting applied research in spatial ecology and conservation of wildlife.

During his degree, Steven was able to pursue a wide array of research interests, including behavioral ecology of African lions, movement ecology and environmental impacts of invasive wild pigs, and the research-implementation gap in human-carnivore conflict research.

As a postdoctoral researcher at Lincoln Park Zoo, Steven will be working with the PMCTrack data set to identify patterns in fulfillment of breeding and transfer recommendations. His objective is to identify institutional and taxa-specific mechanisms to further improve fulfillment of recommendations and to better meet objectives of Species Survival Plans®.

Projects

Publications

  • Gray, S. M., Roloff, G. J., Dennhardt, A. J., Dotters, B. P., & Engstrom, T. T. 2019. Within-Patch Structures Influence Small Mammal Abundance in Managed Forests of Northern California, USA. Forest Science, , fxz037, https://doi.org/10.1093/forsci/fxz037.
  • Montgomery R.A., Elliott K.C., Hayward M.W., Gray S.M., Millspaugh J.J., Riley S.J., Kissui B.M., Kramer D.B., Moll R.J., Mudumba T., Tans E.D., Muneza A.B., Abade L., Beck J.M., Hoffmann C.F., Booher C.R. & Macdonald D.W. 2018. Examining evident interdisciplinarity among prides of lion researchers. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 6(49): 1-13. doi: 10.3389/fevo.2018.00049.
  • Gray, S. M., Montgomery, R. A., Millspaugh, J. J., & Hayward, M. W. 2017. Spatiotemporal variation in African lion roaring in relation to a dominance shift. Journal of Mammalogy, 98(4), 1088–1095. https://doi.org/10.1093/jmammal/gyx020.
  • Moll, R. J., Redilla, K. M., Mudumba, T., Muneza, A. B., Gray, S. M., Abade, L., Hayward, M.W., Millspaugh, J.J., & Montgomery, R. A. 2017. The many faces of fear: A synthesis of methodological variation in characterizing predation risk. Journal of Animal Ecology, 86(4), 749–765. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.12680.
  • Gray, S. M., Killion, A. K., Roloff, G. J., Dotters, B. P., & Engstrom, T. T. 2016. Fine-Scale Correlates of Small Mammal Abundance in Industrial Forests of Northern California. Northwest Science, 90(3), 301–314. https://doi.org/10.3955/046.090.0309.
  • Gray, S. M., Roloff, G. J., Montgomery, R. A., Beasley, J. C, & Pepin, K. M. Invasive Wild Pigs in North America: Ecology, Impacts and Management (in press). Behaviors and Spatial Ecology. In K. C. VerCauteren, J. C. Beasley, S. S. Ditchkoff, J. J. Mayer, G. J. Roloff, and B. K. Strickland (Eds.).