Top 10 Reasons to Visit the Zoo in Winter

Although many people don’t think to frequent the zoo in the middle of the coldest months of the year, the zoo is open every day. Yes, the zoo is beautiful at the height of summer, with hardy hibiscus blooming while trumpeter swans and different duck species rest along the banks of the pond. But the…

Kevin, Asian Small-clawed Otter

Lincoln Park Zoo is happy to announce that an 11-year-old male Asian small-clawed otter named Kevin can now be seen at Regenstein Small Mammal-Reptile House. Kevin has joined 2-year-old female Namiko in a newly renovated habitat that features a den and a natural landscape with dirt and live plants, plus a pool for these little…

Black-and-white Colobus Monkey

The zoo is celebrating a tiny new arrival! On Saturday, December 3, a male black-and-white colobus monkey was born to dam Kutaka as a recommendation by the Guereza Colobus Species Survival Plan®. The youngster joins his mother and siblings Nola and Zinga in the viewable habitat at Helen Brach Primate House. The infant’s sire, Keanjaha,…

Top 10 Lincoln Park Zoo Happenings in 2022

The zoo may only encompass 49 acres of space in Chicago, but Lincoln Park Zoo’s footprint so much larger than you’d think. International-level conservation work, advances in animal care, and research and education take place here every single day of the year as part of our mission to connect people with nature, continually expanding our…

Celebrate Sustainably: Tips for Gifting with an Eco-friendly Touch

‘Tis the season to spread a bit of cheer! With the holidays now in full swing, it’s that time of year when we’re all thinking of ways to give our loved ones gifts that bring joy. As part of Lincoln Park Zoo’s commitment to advocating for the environment and wildlife, our Green Team presents these…

Reo, Klipspringer

Lincoln Park Zoo is pleased to announce the arrival of a female klipspringer! Reo arrived from the San Diego Zoo and is sharing a habitat at Regenstein African Journey with Dash, the resident male klipspringer. These two little antelopes have been paired by a recommendation from the Klipspringer Species Survival Plan®. Klipspringer adults are sometimes…

Life and Legacy: Bur Oaks And Other Trees At Lincoln Park Zoo

You may have seen that the 250- to 300-year old bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) on Lincoln Park Zoo’s South Lawn is at the natural end of its life—the news has been featured in local news outlets, such as WTTW. As the articles about it point out, the tree predates not only the founding of Chicago,…

Saving Little Fire Faces

Darkness lies all around Lincoln Park Zoo keeper Bryan Summerford as he crouches in the fragmented forests of West Java, Indonesia, surprisingly nestled up next to coffee and other agriculture fields. Armed with a red flashlight, notebook, and camera, he waits. In a flash, the species he seeks darts across the bamboo thicke—as critically endangered slow lorises are anything but slow. The group of researchers he’s with takes note of the tracking device around the loris’ neck, part of a concerted effort to monitor and conserve these bug-eyed beauties.

Surprising Science

Lincoln Park Zoo scientists labor year-round on research projects designed to help humans learn more about animals in many different contexts. This type of work allows the zoo to better care for the individuals that reside here. Visitors don’t necessarily see all the effort that staff put into projects like these—but can often see the results. For the animals in our care, this translates into more dynamic living spaces, improved enrichment, and actions that make life better, safer, and more natural. For animals in the wild, this leads to improved understanding and better conservation strategies and outcomes.

From Zoo Teen to Team Zoo

Lincoln Park Zoo’s teen programs allow students in Grades 8-12 to participate in conservation activities, learn about future careers, and gain experience in fields like education and research. Participating teens also become part of the zoo family, which gives them access to mentors, peers who share their interests, and a network to support them in the future. For example, alumni return to the zoo each year for a reunion. Alums also assist with recruitment and planning, are invited back as speakers, can opt-in to receive updates (including job postings and animal updates) from the zoo, and receive memberships. And, as evidenced by a couple of the teen alums profiled here, they may even someday become full-time zoo staff!