Domestic Chicken

Domestic chickens vary in appearance from breed to breed, though they share some common traits, including a squat stature, a rounded body, dense feathers, and wattles of flesh around the face. Adult males, called roosters, have distinct combs of red flesh on their head and striking plumage—notably, a flowing tail and shiny, pointed feathers. Wild…

Domestic Cattle

Domestic cattle are large, heavy mammals that vary in size and appearance. Although there are many breeds of cattle, only Milking Shorthorn and Dutch Belted are represented at Lincoln Park Zoo. These heritage breeds are not as large as some other dairy cows. Milking Shorthorns, “established” in the 18th century in Northeastern England, are usually…

Yellow-spotted Amazon River Turtle

Yellow-spotted Amazon River turtles are some of the largest turtles in South America, with females reaching up to twice the size of males. They have a dark upper shell and yellow spots across their head. Both sexes eat a variety of food, ranging from fruit and plant material to fish and small invertebrates. Females lay…

White-faced Saki

White-faced sakis are small, sexually dimorphic monkeys that weigh about three to five pounds. Males have black fur surrounding their light brown-furred faces. Females are lighter, with bright strips of hair from their eyes to chin. Both sexes have flat, wide noses. While they are primarily frugivores, sakis also eat seeds and occasionally small mammals…

White-blotched River Stingray

White-blotched river stingrays are black with white spots across the top of their body and tail. Their enlarged pectoral fins make them look like floating discs. At maturity, they average about 16 inches across, but individuals can reach up to 30 inches in length. Their mouth and gills are located on their underside, allowing them…

Spectacled Caiman

Spectacled caimans were named for the bony ridge above their eyes, which resembles a pair of glasses. Adults are dull green and can grow to more than six feet in length. They primarily eat fish, insects, frogs, birds, and even mammals. After breeding, females lay eggs in nests built with mud and leaves.

Southern Three-banded Armadillo

Southern three-banded armadillo were named for the three distinct hinges across their mid-section that allow them to curl into a ball when threatened. These small mammals weigh about three pounds and can reach up to 12 inches in length. They typically feed on ants, beetle larvae, and termites. A long, sticky tongue helps them gather…

Red-footed Tortoise

Red-footed tortoises were named for the red-and-orange markings scattered across their limbs and face. They have bumpy, concave, greenish-brown shells and display upraised points on their central plates. These tortoises can reach up to 14 inches in length. As omnivores, they feed primarily on fruit, greens, plants, vegetables, and dead animals. After breeding, females bury…

Golden-headed Lion Tamarin

Golden-headed lion tamarins are small primates named for the bright-gold mane around their head. These lion-like manes contrast sharply with their dark brown to black bodies. They spend almost all their time in the rainforest canopy, where they feed primarily on fruit and insects. Golden-headed lion tamarins live in groups consisting of a breeding pair…

Aruba Island Rattlesnake

Aruba Island rattlesnakes vary from gray to pink to brown based on the color of their habitat. Their head and neck are adorned with diamond-shaped markings, which can extend down their body. These rattlesnakes can grow two to three feet in length. They are nocturnal during the warmer months, but are most active in early…