Kenya sand boa in exhibit

Kenya Sand Boa

Scientific Name

Gongylophis colubrinus loveridgei

Class

Reptilia

Order

Squamata

Range

East Africa

Habitat

Dry deserts

Estimated Wild Population

n/a
Kenya sand boa in exhibit
IUCN Conservation Status: Not Listed IUCN Conservation Status: Not Listed

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Physical Description

Kenya sand boas have alternating orange-and-brown speckled patterns running down the length of their back. They are sexually dimorphic, meaning males and females differ in appearance. Females can grow up to 32 inches long while males max out at 15 inches. They spend much of their time hiding beneath the sand, under stones, and in burrows—they are excellent diggers and can quickly bury themselves. These snakes feed primarily on rodents, which they kill via constriction.

Interesting Fact 1

To avoid the extreme heat of their desert habitat, Kenya sand boas only emerge in the early morning and evening to hunt.

Interesting Fact 2

Eggs hatch while still inside the female's body.

Interesting Fact 3

In order to mate, males often have to dig females out of the sand, where they spend most of their time.

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