Domestic cattle in exhibit

Domestic Cattle

Scientific Name

Bos taurus

Class

Mammalia

Order

Artiodactyla

Range

Domesticated around the world

Habitat

n/a

Estimated Wild Population

n/a
Domestic cattle in exhibit
IUCN Conservation Status: Not Listed IUCN Conservation Status: Not Listed

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Physical Description

Domestic cattle are large, heavy mammals that vary in size and appearance. Although there are many breeds of cattle, only Milking Shorthorn and Dutch Belted are represented at Lincoln Park Zoo. These heritage breeds are not as large as some other dairy cows. Milking Shorthorns, "established" in the 18th century in Northeastern England, are usually red, red with white markings, white, or roan. Dutch Belted have a white "belt" wrapping around their middle, framed on both sides by either black or red coloring. As a whole, cattle feed primarily on hay.

Interesting Fact 1

Cattle have poor depth perception but advanced panoramic vision, allowing them to see a wide horizontal space without turning their head.

Interesting Fact 2

Cows have four-chambered stomachs that break down tough foods, like grass, more efficiently.

Interesting Fact 3

There are more than 1 billion cows in the world.

Animal Care staff working with seal

Commitment to Care

Lincoln Park Zoo prioritizes individual well-being over everything else. Guided by scientific research, staff and volunteers work to provide the best welfare outcomes for each individual in the zoo’s care. 

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Two Chilean flamingos in exhibit

Animals Depend On People Too

When you ADOPT an animal, you support world-class animal care by helping to provide specially formulated diets, new habitat elements, and regular veterinary checkups.

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Asian small-clawed otter in exhibit

Wish List

The Wish List is full of one-of-a-kind items for the zoo’s animals, including nutritious snacks and enrichment items to keep them active and healthy.  

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Take Action With Us

Wildlife face many daunting challenges—some global, like planet-wide climate change, and some that affect individuals, like an animal ingesting plastic—but now is not the time to despair. None of these problems are too big for us to come together and solve.

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