New Zoo Royalty

As you know, we’ve been happy to celebrate the reign of baby King at the Harris Family Foundation Black Rhinoceros Exhibit. But the zoo has now welcomed more royal residents with the additional of a “crowned” lemur family at the Helen Brach Primate House.

Unsurprisingly, the species gets its name from the crown-shaped fur above its forehead. While both genders display this distinctive marking on top, they can be distinguished by their body coloration below, as females are gray while males are chestnut brown.

We have males and females in our crowned lemur family group: male Sokkwi, female Tucker, son Nuru and their most recent offspring, 5-month-old boy Azizi. They came to us from Indianapolis Zoo in September and have spent the past week acclimating to their new home on exhibit.

Two members of the new crowned lemur family at the Helen Brach Primate House.

Two members of the new crowned lemur family at the Helen Brach Primate House.

Native only to northern Madagascar, crowned lemurs favor rugged terrain in the wild, living in forests sprouting from the island’s limestone “towers.” They forage through the canopy for fruit, leaves and the occasional insect, living in groups of five–six individuals led by a dominant female.

Native to Madagascar, this species is vulnerable in the wild.

Native to Madagascar, this species is vulnerable in the wild.

At the zoo, they join other Madagascar species including spider tortoises, Standing’s day geckos and, of course, our Madagascar hissing cockroaches. I encourage you to come see these newest arrivals, representatives of an ecosystem unlike any other on Earth.

In other news, I’m glad to share the Observe to Learn app produced by the Hurvis Center for Learning Innovation and Collaboration was presented a Superior Achievement Award by the Illinois Association of Museums (IAM) on October 18. The app, which guides users through animal-behavior studies like those conducted by zoo experts, has been downloaded by users around the world. I’m proud the IAM recognized the Hurvis Center’s groundbreaking work.

Thousands of kids joined us for free, safe trick or treating at last weekend's Spooky Zoo Spectacular, hosted by the Auxiliary Board of Lincoln Park Zoo.

Thousands of kids joined us for free, safe trick or treating at last weekend's Spooky Zoo Spectacular, hosted by the Auxiliary Board of Lincoln Park Zoo.

Finally, thanks to all the ghosts and goblins who joined us for Spooky Zoo Spectacular last Saturday. As always, the Auxiliary Board of Lincoln Park Zoo did a great job with this free, annual event, which welcomes kids from around the city for holiday fun and safe trick or treating.

Kevin Bell

Comments

Lemurs YEAH!

I had the opportunity to visit Madagascar last fall. It was the saddest trip I have ever taken as there is almost no habitat left for these wondrous creatures. Fingers are crossed that the country is able to have an election soon and establish a government that can protect what little wildlife is left.

Zoo Royalty

Interesting! I hope that everyone is having a happy Halloween!

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