A Little Lemur

Spring is stereotypically the season of new arrivals, and, happily, that’s what we’re seeing at Lincoln Park Zoo.

The first baby of the season was a klipspringer calf born behind the scenes at Regenstein African Journey on March 30. A tiny Sichuan takin joined the herd at the Antelope & Zebra Area last week. And now a baby crowned lemur has joined the troop at the Helen Brach Primate House.

A closeup of the baby crowned lemur clinging to mom. Photo by Assistant Lead Keeper Anita Yantz.

A closeup of the baby crowned lemur clinging to mom. Photo by Assistant Lead Keeper Anita Yantz.

The little primate was born April 14. Its gender is unknown, because it still spends much of its time clinging close to mom, Tucker, but we were able to get this photo to share.

The baby is the fifth offspring for breeding pair Tucker and Sokkwi, who came to us from Indianapolis Zoo last fall with their older offspring, males Nuru and Azizi. The little one will likely grow fast, although it will continue to stay close to mom as it nurses for the next five–six months.

A look at the baby is nestled within mom's fur. Photo by Assistant Lead Keeper Anita Yantz.

A look at the baby is nestled within mom's fur. Photo by Assistant Lead Keeper Anita Yantz.

Named for the crown-patterned fur atop their heads, crowned lemurs are native to the rugged forests of Madagascar. Living in small groups led by females, this species forages through the treetops for fruit, leaves and insects. They’re vulnerable in the wild due to habitat loss and poaching, so it’s a thrill to welcome this arrival at the zoo.

The baby lemur wasn’t the only arrival this week. Lincoln Park Zoo also welcomed dozens of educators for the Innovation and the Living World Symposium hosted by the zoo’s Hurvis Center for Learning Innovation and Collaboration.

Participants in the Innovation and the Living World Symposium gather on the front steps of the Laflin Memorial Building.

Participants in the Innovation and the Living World Symposium gather on the front steps of the Laflin Memorial Building.

Participants from 18 states and four countries traveled in to discuss how to spark hands-on learning in institutions with living collections, including zoos, aquariums, nature centers and botanic gardens. Plenty of exciting ideas were on display, and we’ll continue to follow up with the participants to find new ways to excite our guests about the wonders of the living world.

Kevin Bell


Learn More

Native to Madagascar, crowned lemurs are vulnerable in the wild.

Post from the President—New Zoo Royalty
President and CEO Kevin Bell introduces the newest residents at the Helen Brach Primate House: a crowned lemur family from the Indianapolis Zoo!

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