Posts from the Curators

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October 20, 2014
Time for a New Tub

Azizi, a male western lowland gorilla who turns 11 in December, has made a tremendous physical transformation over the past few years—and outgrown a certain, favorite piece of furniture.

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September 14, 2011
Dave Bernier

The animal-care staff at the Kovler Lion House recently conducted an exhibit swap with two animals. Our male Amur leopard, Mitya, was moved from an outdoor exhibit into an indoor space and our male jaguar, Kianto, was transferred to the newly vacant, outdoor area.

Sounds simple, right? Hardly. There’s a lot that goes on behind the scenes with each animal move.

August 30, 2011
Diane Mulkerin

I am happy to announce some exciting new-species news. We here in Regenstein Small Mammal-Reptile House recently received a pair of Moholi bushbabies. These charming little primates with their oversized eyes are currently behind the scenes getting to know one another.

Once their introduction is complete, the duo will reside inside the baobab tree between the bat and sand-cat exhibits.

August 16, 2011
Colleen Lynch

Over the last 10 years, the annual hatching of trumpeter swan cygnets has been a mainstay at Lincoln Park Zoo. These chicks have all left the zoo each fall to be released to the wild as part of the Iowa state recovery program for this once-imperiled species.

July 19, 2011
Maureen Leahy

Ah, to be 25 again! Some time ago I was 25 years old, establishing myself as a senior keeper working with primates, full of ambition, ideas and focusing my energy on making a difference in the zoo profession and in the lives of the animals under my care.

June 22, 2011
Diane Mulkerin

We recently confirmed that our North American river otter is not pregnant. I’m disappointed.

For reasons not well understood, some river otters do not breed readily in zoos. Our female was born at an AZA-accredited zoo and our male was an orphaned otter found in Florida. Although he is almost twice the size of the female, she is most definitely “the boss,” which might be part of the problem with them conceiving.

May 26, 2011
Colleen Lynch

In Europe, white storks are considered to be harbingers of health, wealth and the arrival of babies. At Lincoln Park Zoo, our European white storks are tending to offspring of their own.

This year’s first egg appeared on April 6. Additional eggs were laid in the subsequent days, eventually totaling five. The parents shared incubation duties, never leaving the eggs unattended.

The first and only chick appeared on May 12.

May 3, 2011
Dave Bernier

Lincoln Park Zoo acquired a pair of Grant’s gazelles last fall, but wintry weather limited their time in the yard at the savanna exhibit at Regenstein African Journey.

Now that the cold weather is (mostly) behind us, we’re starting to introduce the gazelles to the outdoors. You might notice a visual barrier that reduces the accessible yard to about ¼ its total size.

April 12, 2011
Maureen Leahy

Well, it’s official…it’s a boy! Our newest addition to the white-cheeked gibbon family has ventured off mom long enough for us to get a good look at his gender.

Sai (pronounced “sigh”), which means “son” in Burmese, is the third son of Burma and Caruso, all born at Lincoln Park Zoo.

There are a million reasons why I love my job, but watching animals develop from birth is one of the best.

April 5, 2011
Diane Mulkerin

I’ve been working at Regenstein Small Mammal-Reptile House since the building opened in 1997.

Currently, we have 71 species in the facility, 46 of which are on exhibit. We have 25 species off exhibit for educational programming, breeding or observation, like the dyeing poison arrow frogs that have been part of a nutrition/mating study since 2004.

As a fairly long-lived frog species, dyeing poison arrow frogs are ideal for study.

March 15, 2011
Colleen Lynch

Having worked with birds at Lincoln Park Zoo since 2008, I am aware that our feathered residents can signal the coming of spring. At the end of January, we saw exciting activity with the green woodhoopoes in the McCormick Bird House—discarded eggshells were spotted in the exhibit and the adults were busy carrying insects to the nest box.

If, like me, you are a fan of immediate gratification, woodhoopoes are vexing.

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