Lincoln Park Zoo

Latest Story

September 29, 2014
Heeeere’s Zoovies!

Don’t miss our last free outdoor movie screening of the season this Friday night: a double feature of “Ghostbusters” and “The Shining”!

All Stories

November 9, 2010
New Lincoln Park Zoo Magazine

Explore the zoo’s Community of Care with the Fall 2010 issue of Lincoln Park Zoo magazine. Browse the issue online, download it and enjoy web exclusives and bonus material.

November 8, 2010
Standing's Day Gecko Case Study

In our latest Veterinary Services Case Study, see what's behind swelling in one of our Standing's day geckos.

November 5, 2010
Whose Footprints Are These?

Coordinator of Wildlife Management Vicky Hunt IDs a Nature Boardwalk visitor by its tracks. Come by this weekend to see if you can spot any others!

November 4, 2010
Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake Diet Snapshot

What’s on the menu for the zoo’s eastern massasauga rattlensnakes? Find out with our latest Diet Snapshot and then come see the snakes at Regenstein Small Mammal-Reptile House.

November 4, 2010
Animal Fashion: Cool Coverings

Looking for something for the little ones to do on Veteran's Day? Sign them up for Animal Fashion: Cool Coverings, and they’ll see how stripes and scales help animals thrive.

November 3, 2010
Soaring Sunflowers

Coordinator of Wildlife Management Vicky Hunt looks up at the sunflowers at Nature Boardwalk at Lincoln Park Zoo.

November 2, 2010
Cooperation Calls Us to Japan

In their second Mind of the Chimpanzee news update, scientists Elizabeth Lonsdorf and Steve Ross share the Japanese roots of chimpanzee cooperation.

November 1, 2010
Nature Boardwalk Photo Contest Slideshow

Contributors to the zoo’s Flickr group helped record the first summer of growth at Nature Boardwalk at Lincoln Park Zoo. See their top photos…and follow up by contributing some of your own!

October 28, 2010
Creepy Critters Week: Bats

Vampire bats? Hardly. The flying mammals at Regenstein Small Mammal-Reptile House are Egyptian fruit bats and straw-colored fruit bats, which prefer sucking nectar to human blood. Keepers are so comfortable around the bats that they enter the exhibit every day, allowing the winged residents to flutter around them. The two species occupy different sections of their exhibit, but they’re all busybodies—they squeak to each other and flap their wings when keepers arrive, hoping to get first crack at snacks.

Syndicate content