Crested wood partridge

Latin Name
Rollulus rouloul

Class
Birds

Order
Galliformes

Description

The crested wood partridge is a dimorphic species, meaning males and females differ in appearance. Males have bluish-purple feathers as well as a large red crest on the head, which gives the species its name. Females have green feathers and lack a crest.


 

Range

Myanmar, Thailand, Malay Archipelago


Status

Near threatened due to habitat loss


Habitat

Woodlands, tropical rainforest and bamboo thickets


Niche

The crested wood partridge uses its feet to probe for insects, seeds and fruits on the forest floor.


Life History

The crested wood partridge can live in groups of up to 15 individuals. Breeding pairs dig tunnel-like nests beneath the litter of the forest floor. Offspring can number from four-eight chicks, which are cared for cooperatively by each parent. Larger broods may be divided, with each parent caring exclusively for half. Parents feed chicks for the first week, after which chicks forage for their own food.




Bonus Content

The crested wood partridge chicks are growing fast now, but when they first hatched, they spent plenty of time huddled under mom's "skirts."

Two Broods
The crested wood partridge chicks are growing fast now, but when they first hatched, they spent plenty of time huddled under mom’s “skirts.”

Our male crested wood partridge was among the top dads featured on Father's Day

Father's Day Slideshow
As people celebrated dads of all shapes and sizes, we took a look at some of the top fathers at Lincoln Park Zoo.

 

 


ARKive Media

ARKive video - Crested partridge - overviewARKive image - Crested partridge nest showing eggsARKive image - Male crested partridge with chicks

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Lincoln Park Zoo Exhibit